Tuesday, 17 February 2009

Cameron's commitment to Localism

It was three years ago, in February 2006, when I heard David Cameron speak at the launch of Helena Kennedy's Power Enquiry report. His support of a Localist agenda then, I must be honest, won me over. For the past three years I have watched for every mention, every recognition, of a Localist manifesto emerging; it has popped its head up, buried in speeches, given various mentions, but never allowed out on its own. The mild slapping-down given to Dan Hannan and Douglas Carswell's 'Plan' was mildly discouraging. Today Cameron launches a major Localist policy initiative, with a short piece in the Guardian and an appearance on R4's 'Today' by Caroline Spelman.

Well, it's not 'Big Bang' Localism, but it's the nearest any party will get to it. And for that I applaud Cameron and lend him my full support.

I hope to constructively analise the policy paper as soon as I can, but there's an extra bounce in my step this morning.

3 comments:

Blue Eyes said...

"there's an extra bounce in my step this morning"

mine too, I can almost smell the impending change in the air - I hope the Tories don't screw up this chance.

I am not sure that Big Bang localism would be very sensible given the poor quality of some councillors. I say hand down responsibility steadily so that electorates have a chance to absorb the new reality and elect good administrators.

Alfred the Ordinary said...

Thanks for the link to the report. Of course with recommendations such as

11. A new overarching select committee should be established to scrutinise the Executive’s activities in supranational bodies and multilateral negotiations, particularly in relation to the European Union, and to ensure these activities are held to account and conducted in the best interests of the British people.

It is going to go nowhere with this government.

I recommend 2 books, essential to understand why this will fail.

1. The Triumph of the Political Class, Peter Oborne. A somewhat splenetic look at the destruction of national institutions to make them mere political pawns, over the last 15, or so, years.

2. Just Law, Baroness Helena Kennedy. She charts the slow death of the freedoms that we have under Common Law.

it's either banned or compulsory said...

"Over the last century Britain has become one of the most centralised countries in the developed world as power has been sucked to Westminster."

Really ? Power handed upwards to the EU, Sideways to the Quangos and Downwards to the unelected EU funded Regions that no-one asked for.
How does Mr. Cameron aim to get any of it back and into Local Authorities ?