Friday, 29 January 2010

1979 was a turning point

Comments below have quite rightly pointed out that we didn't go from 0 to 70 in 1979, that there had been precursors, such as the retrograde police reforms of 1964, and the monstrous local government reorganisation of 1974, and the great social changes of the 60s and early 70s that reverbrated amongst a newly Godless society. However, I hold that the late 70s - and 1979 seems right on the button - marked the beginning of a period of change of quite a different order.

The baby boomers, the dominant population cohort of our lifetimes, born during the '50s, reached young adulthood in the late 70s. In their testosterone fuelled 20s and 30s, they were the beneficiaries of Thatcherite opportunities, and they grabbed the 80s with both hands. They were also the beneficiaries of 60s liberalism, and though the contraceptive pill was as available as aspirin by the 70s, it was the boomers who pushed bastardy through the gates from 1979 - leaving us with a massive problem now from the underclass that they bred (see below).



And it was Thatcher's war on local government - on the independence of her own Conservative councils as well as the rainbow coalitions of the nuclear-free Left - that did more than anything to establish the corrosive Central State and establish the poisonous metropolitan political class. She stopped listening to Ralph Harris and Arthur Seldon and stopped reading Hayek. It was the start of 'big government', to the dismay of her former advisors;
Alas, you need government, but big government is subject to such flaws, incorrigible flaws. Big government is irresponsible government because they can’t know all the circumstances of the nation, the society, the families that they are administering. Big government leads to all kinds of deals, backstage deals about policies, and all the time they are governed not by the public interest, but by the self-interest of the politicians to maintain their power. You need politicians, but the more you can contain politicians to the central tasks they have to do, the less you tempt them into this vote-grabbing, this corruption and deceit which is inseparable from modern, mass, undiscriminating democratic politics.
Thatcher forgot Burkean remedies and neglected the little platoons. As Blond has it;
Conservatives who believe in value, culture and truth should therefore think twice before calling themselves liberal. Liberalism can only be a virtue when linked to a politics of the common good, a problem which the best liberals—Mill, Adam Smith and Gladstone—recognised but could never resolve. A vision of the good life cannot come from liberal principles. Unlimited liberalism produces atomised relativism and state absolutism. Insofar as both the Tories and Labour have been contaminated by liberalism, the true left-right legacy of the postwar period is, unsurprisingly, a centralised authoritarian state and a fragmented and disassociative society.
I know there are those who bristle at the slightest criticism of the Blessed St Margaret, and she is in truth a giant amongst politicians, a Statesman of international dimension and the most important political figure in Britain since Churchill, but even our idols have feet of clay, and Thatcher's was her part in the establishment of the Leviathan that is now strangling the nation.

So I'll stick with 1979.

3 comments:

Nick Drew said...

well you know my view, R, it was the 1977 Homeless Persons Act

which is entirely consistent with '1979' because these things take a while to achieve lift-off

Newmania said...

I am of youir opinion I feel with Margaret Thacther that she was at heart a Conservatuve who slowly became soemthing else . She started on the left of the Party

Krauser said...

Do you have a demographic breakdown of the bastardy rate? I'd suspect it's concentrated in blacks and chavs, with a smattering of "empowered" women.

This is the single biggest reason for the epidemic of crime, lawlessness and low taste in british culture - no strong male role models and the gradual disenfranchisment of males from their children.

Matriarchy destroys civilisation faster than any other plague, as the Romans, Spartans and Babylonians all found to their cost.