Friday, 30 July 2010

It's not just us, then

Despite what the government price indices are telling me, I'm quite aware that a 4-bag Tesco shop that used to cost £36 now costs £53 and no sign of falling, even though I'm substituting cheaper choices and taking advantage of BOGOFs.

The Times of India carries a piece today on the effects there of fifteen months of double-digit food inflation - rather more serious than having to switch from Pork loin to belly. In India the urban poor are being worst hit - and it's the prices of basics and essentials that have risen the most;
In a country with a large population of vegetarians, the absence of milk and dal from the daily diet means that the poor in India, the bulk of them employed in manual labour, are simply not getting adequate proteins. Non-vegetarian families, like the Prasads on the eastern fringes of Kolkata, are being forced to reduce their meat intake and eat the less nutritious parts of chicken and mutton.
But it's the online comments that convince me that India is just a mini-me version of the UK; this could have appeared as an OT comment on almost any of Iain Dale's blog posts;
Dear Mr Rishi, POPULATION. NO, you have to blame the government for not having proper, civilized and growth oriented EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM.We as a nation has compromised a lot for the MATERIALISTIC WORLD. The system has to educate children right from the tender age to register in their mind what is this nation has to be in the next generation and teach how to keep our house and around clean etc.. which majority of the schools do not educate. It has to be part of curriculum so that when they grow, they will be aware of population explosion problem, greenery, environmental awareness, taking care of animals, be happy and make others happy. For example, see how our common people handle the common toilets either in a public roads, railways stations and even in trains. Nobody has the slightest clue on cleanliness. Hope next generation grows even better for a better living. Jai Hind.
Hey ho.

2 comments:

BrianSJ said...

The food price inflation is real, but commodity prices haven't gone up, so who is getting the money?

Anonymous said...

In France, which is reckoned to be an expensive country, I am amazes how much I DONT pay for a trolley load including wine. A brimming trolley costs about €30 - 35. A 3 litre wine box (Merlot) is €4 and over here £12-14.

No blimmin wonder we're wincing!

Coney Island