Monday, 22 November 2010

Labour's opportunist lust for power

The past week has confirmed what I knew all along - that Labour now lacks any kind of moral or ethical foundation, and is an organisation dedicated solely to the gaining and consolidation of political power for its own rewards. Miliband's message that Labour must start "with a blank page" and base its new ideology on policies that voters like, rather than policies to which the party has an historical or ideological commitment makes the scrapping of Labour's history clear. 


Harman's enthusiastic applause of Ed Miliband's condemnation of the Iraq war demonstrates that Labour is now committed to the "A big boy did it and ran away" strategy; her honest answer to David's question "Why are you clapping? You voted for it" should have been "Because I'm distancing myself from Gordon and Tony". Balls, too, has seen the blinding light of Damascene conversion. This Statist freak whose goggle-eyed support of 90 days detention was absolute, who warned that reducing it to 42 days would kill people, is now coming out in support of 14 days. The stench of hypocrisy rises like a miasma from the opposition benches. 


Labour should cut the guff and go straight to political bribery. "If we win the election, we'll reward our supporters from public funds" may be the quickest and most honest way to cobble a Labour manifesto together; it is, after all, a truth recognised almost universally. 

5 comments:

Edward Spalton said...

At least in the "Good Old Days" of old-fashioned corruption, parliamentary candidates spent their own (or their patron's) money to roast oxen and tap barrels of beer in the street to treat their supporters, who then voted openly on the hustings - no hole-in-the corner polling booths then!

Whilst most people did not have a vote they could see those who did exercising theirs and make their opinions noisily and sometimes violently felt. The candidates usually had to be locally known and acceptable men.

Some places were less exciting than others. There was little corruption of electors in Derby until the Tories started putting up candidates in the early 19th century. Until then, the Whig Cavendish family (Dukes of Devonshire) only had to let it be known who their favoured candidate was - and he was in!
Just within living memory, church bells were rung in North Derbyshire on the election of the family's candidate. I knew an old radical smallholder who got into the belfry when the bells were rung up ready for the walkover. He muffled one of the bells (as for a funeral) so it sounded distinctly odd, once they started ringing.

I can't help thinking that the sort of candidates returned were, for all their obvious faults and limitations, probably preferable to today's "team-playing", London-centric, machine politicians, picked for their docility as voting cattle in the lobbies.

Robert said...

Are the Europhile socialists who are in government any different?

wonderfulforhisage said...

"Miliband's message that Labour must start "with a blank page" and base its new ideology on policies that voters like, rather than policies to which the party has an historical or ideological commitment makes the scrapping of Labour's history clear."

You would have thought that Cameron's missing of an open goal after five years of a similar policy would disuade him.

Weekend Yachtsman said...

I hate to rain on your parade Mr. R, but I think you'll find ALL political parties are "organisation[s] dedicated solely to the gaining and consolidation of political power for its own rewards"

Certainly there's not much sign of Call-me-Dave being any different; how many election pledges has he broken now? I've kinda lost count.

Anonymous said...

A blank page.
Just like their brains.