Thursday, 26 May 2011

Parachute allowances

With much sound and fury the Telegraph's 'defence correspondent' announces that 4,000 parachute trained soldiers are to lose their £180 a month para wings allowance, suggesting that this will hit the poorest paid private soldiers. The BBC led with the news on the 6am bulletin - it fits neatly with their anti-cuts agenda, after all. In fact you have to read deep in the Telegraph piece to discern that the allowance is just being restricted to those soldiers who may conceivably be asked to parachute. For years soldiers of all ranks have contrived to add this bit of bling to their service dress and earn an extra £2k a year; there's hardly a general in Whitehall who doesn't sport the little wings. But the chances that Gen. Barney White-Spunner (pictured) and his chums will ever be asked to step out of anything more elevated than an MOD staff car are remote, and in this instance the payment of the allowance is really undeserved and should be ended. And Thomas Harding and the muppets at the beeb should try to find the word 'gullible' in their dictionaries. 

5 comments:

Barnacle Bill said...

If this allowance was removed there would be a number of poorly paid squadies hit.
Reform would be a better route, maybe changing it to a one off payment and restricted by rank.
As for General White-Spunner, if push came to shove, he would jump.

Anonymous said...

"As for General White-Spunner, if push came to shove, he would jump."

If push came to shove I suspect there would be many willing to give him both.

Anonymous said...

You are talking about a qualification . And one that is not lightly given.
Would you deny a tradesman regular payment for his skills or deny him his wages when he did a bit less for a while.

Anonymous said...

You are talking about a qualification . And one that is not lightly given.
Would you deny a tradesman regular payment for his skills or deny him his wages when he did a bit less for a while.

Raedwald said...

1. This isn't about White-Spunner and his undoubted gallantry, or that of his chums.

2. A few years ago, a medium sized firm found itself short of the 10 designated first-aiders it needed. The HR department came up with the idea of paying £400 a year to trained first-aiders as an incentive. It took a year for the accountants to twig that 500 staff had qualified and were claiming the allowance. The 10 designated first-aiders were angry that the other 490 qualified personnel were being paid the same wedge for no obligation.

The firm eventually settled for paying £400 a year to the designated first-aiders and £40 a year to those who registered as qualified and willing to become DFAs if a vacancy arose. Is this beyond the MOD to emulate?