Tuesday, 17 May 2011

Reasons to be Cheerful

I am not wealthy or well-connected nor am I powerful. Like millions of us, I'm an ordinary English yeoman who labours daily, respects the law, strives not just to avoid evil but to do good and take my social and democratic responsibilities seriously. There is scant reward on Earth, one may think, for us - but this is not quite the case.


Richard North is absolutely spot on. With a hot bath running, a clean ironed shirt and linen to don, the benison of freshly-brewed coffee and the first cigarette of the day at my side, I am fortunate indeed compared to Strauss-Kahn, who right now is lying sweating, unbathed and itchily awake in his piss-stinking Rikers Island cell fearful of the clashing noise, the flourescent glare of the always-on lights and the threats and shouts, screams and sobs of his fellow prisoners.  


Lord help me, but the knowledge that one of 'them' is getting his comeuppance fills me with cheer. 

25 comments:

Anonymous said...

I know exactly what you mean and how you feel. 'Twas only yesterday that I said to my wife "at last, one of those theiving political bastards is going to get it".

You see DSK is one of Europe's political elite; one of the untouchables that has his hand in our till and in some chambermaids knickers; and it seems he has form in this regard.

But he reckoned without America where political fortunes are won or lost on the American sense of fair play. He reckoned without the sense of justice and injustice done. He reckoned without the fact that the police couldn't give a fuck who you are, they will clap you in handcuffs and throw you in jail if you are wrong-doer. That goes for presidents past and president wannabes.

DSK forgot for one moment that he was playing in a different country where his influence and power grabbing meant nothing to these guys. He was just another suspect of a foul crime.

You can almost feel the panic in his chest when he was sat on the plane, waiting on the tarmac, delayed for some reason that he knew not, but was about to find out - and his name comes over the tannoy "will Msr Dominic Strauss-Khan please make himself known"....

Our political class needs to sit up, take note and take care today.

Coney Island

Weekend Yachtsman said...

Yes it's a nice feeling isn't it?

Suck it up, Mr. Frog!

Rush-is-Right said...

What's the French for schadenfreud?

Blue Eyes said...

Totally agree. Except I don't smoke...

English Pensioner said...

And I'm also getting enjoyment from reading the various conspiracy theories, and who may have framed him. All seem plausible except for the one suggesting Gordon Brown did it in order that he can step in and save the world because I don't think he could organise the proverbial booze up in a brewery!

Sean said...

Who shall we pity the most, DSK or the French nation?

And the trial will be televised, how utterly wonderful! how totally not french, and a jury of his peers, how also not french.

I notice Jean-Claude Juncker and his eurofanatic buddies found the whole thing distasteful!

Juncker said he was 'very sad and upset,' as he described Strauss-Kahn as 'a very good friend' and said he 'did not like' pictures showing him handcuffed in the hands of the police.

get yourself a very large Cuba Cigar, this is going to take a long while.

Three Card Trick said...

Apart from a sizeable (geddit?) majority of dumbass rednecks, the (most recent...) death of Bin-Laden didn't quite do the business.

What is "the other hand" doing whilst we're distracted by this bit of theatre (or should that be theater)?

hatfield girl said...

Drives a coach and horses through any notion of diplomatic immunity, the treatment of the managing director of the IMF, though, doesn't it?

Anyone who is invited to act as a high-ranking functionary of an international institution like the IMF, World Bank or indeed the UN might like to think carefully before accepting in the belief they are covered by diplomatic immunity while abroad.

It doesn't matter if he did it or he didn't; what matters is that there is safe conduct for diplomats if international relations are to function at all. Even the murderers who fired machine guns from a London embassy and slaughtered a police officer had to be allowed to leave - and there the occurrences were incontrovertible.

Goodness knows if it is the United States or one of its federal component states that has destroyed any further faith in diplomatic immunity, but many sensible people will now not undertake work that puts them at risk of what has been done to Mr Strauss-Kahn, regardless of what he may or may not have done.

And the notion that there can be diplomatic immunity that applies only sometimes and not others is clearly ill-founded. We have only to look at the case presented to our Parliament for attacking Iraq to know that realities can be manipulated. Diplomatic immunity is 100% or it is worthless.

Demetrius said...

Has anyone, I ask, considered the feelings of the other inhabitants of Rikers Island?

V. Enna-Convention said...

The Saudi diplomat gunned down in cold blood yesterday also discovered to his cost that dip immunity is worthless to those who don't give a damn about the niceties of international relations.

Added to which, such immunity only applies when one needs it for "doing one's job". Faffing about with a chambermaid might not meet this consideration.

hatfield girl said...

"immunity only applies when one needs it for "doing one's job". Faffing about with a chambermaid might not meet this consideration."

Immunity is immunity even when you are watched gunning down police officers in St James's. It can't be decided piecemeal. It has to be waived by the sovereign. And you cannot waive it yourself either - that's the sovereign's to do. (in the case of leaders of international organisations it seems to be deriving from the international treaties setting up those organisation, but that's another can of worms). If accusation renders someone under immunity to being treated like Mr Strauss-Kahn it does make you wonder what it's worth, and if going to foreign parts is dodgier than we think it already.

Rossa said...

The suggestion is that with the US economy on its knees the IMF wasn't willing to bail them out on favourable terms.

Fancy doing that to your bank manager!

Gordo said...

Marine for President!

krauser said...

Doesn't it bother you that yet another man is having his life / career / reputation ruined on a false rape charge, or at the very least the flimsiest of evidence?

Like the feminazis and manginas you are goosestepping in line with, rape is so terrible a crime that innocence is no defence.

The fact DSK is a thoroughly objectionable man should have nothing to do with it. All your pompous talk about personal rights and the blackheart Rousseau - and here you are laughing at the destruction of a man without fair trial.

Disappointing.

Defend to the death...? said...

With regards to the postings by 'Hatfield Girl'.

"...faith in diplomatic immunity, but many sensible people will now not undertake work that puts them at risk of what has been done to Mr Strauss-Kahn."

I should hope to God that 'many sensible people' wouldn't commit the heinous crime/s that Mr Strauss-Kahn is alleged to have commited, safe in the knowledge that they are untouchable if found out.

Is this what it's come to: a certain 'class' of people can behave in the most horrific way and escape justice because they are deemed (by rules created by other members of their class) to be too important to the welfare of the planet?

Would we really be worse off if 'Diplomatic Immunity' was abolished...

Big Boys Territory said...

Krauser - "Doesn't it bother you that yet another man is having his life / career / reputation ruined on a false rape charge, or at the very least the flimsiest of evidence?"

If he has been "setup", it aint the little people wot have dun for im.

At least he's got a fighting chance, unlike Dr David Kelly...

Raedwald said...

HG - Th point abut the principle of diplomatic immunity is well made. However, such immunity only applies when the emissary or representative of the State or organisation is on official business 'abroad'. As the IMF is based in the US, DSK could well have been covered by such immunity if he'd attempted to rape a British hotel maid in the Goring Hotel whilst here as an IMF representative.

Raedwald said...

Krauser - There's something that rings true about this to the extent that I'm confident a jury of US citizens will judge DSK fairly and equitably. The DA's lack of hesitation in charging makes this completely different to, for example, the arrest of Chris Jeffries for Joanna Yates' murder.

No doubt the hotel's corridor video cams will have recorded the naked and priapic Msr Strauss-Kahn grossly assaulting the maid or some such conclusive evidence.

hatfield girl said...

"a certain 'class' of people can behave in the most horrific way and escape justice because they are deemed (by rules created by other members of their class) to be too important to the welfare of the planet?"

That's the other can of worms I referred to: can an institution created by treaty take on sovereign powers as if it were a supra-national state?

Have our sovereign nation states created monsters in signing international treaties that create these bodies?

If they have then the fact that the IMF is based in Washington doesn't limit the diplomatic immunity enjoyed by its managing director, R.

Umbongo said...

hg

Before blowing your top, maybe you should have done a bit of research. This publication issued by the IMF last year states (on page 666) [my bold] that:

" . . officers, and employees of the Fund shall be immune from legal process with respect to acts performed by them in their official capacity except when the Fund waives this immunity."

It's clear that the immunity of IMF officials is not as wide-ranging as those of traditional diplomats. Unless DSK's official business includes allegedly assaulting chamber-maids any claim by him for legal immunity would be weak to say the least.

Anonymous said...

How do you know it wasn't a honey trap? After quite cheap to do and see how effective it is.

Edward Spalton said...

It would take a heart of stone not to laugh - but I bet the next head of the IMF and every other supranational organisation make sure that he has legal diplomatic immunity wherever they go -just like our dear leaders of the EU.

Poisonedchalice said...

Hey guys, the new head of the imf is likely to be...Gordon Brown!!!

Gordo said...

Diplomatic immunity was designed for use between nations. Its extension to international organisations such as the IMF was simply a means for the jet set globalist and globalising elite to place themselves above the law. It should never have been allowed and should be discontinued now. Sweep away the NWO.

Steve said...

It is rather heartening that DSK might have got more than just carnal satisfaction.
http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/imf_accuser_in_apt_for_hiv_vics_oZmUkbtouJ14RHw1434HvJ