Wednesday, 22 June 2011

A Junkie's word

Like a smack-head desperate for a fix, Greece is ready to promise anything to get its hands on the next instalment of EU / IMF cash. "On my mother's grave, it's for milk for my baby" she pleads, before using the cash to buy the next wrap of brown poison. There can be few who actually believe Greece will enact the austerity measures promised; to do so would be to invite complete revolution. But the EU / IMF aren't quite ready to deal with Greek default, so they pretend to believe that Greece means it, and agree to buy another 12 weeks of time at a cost of £100bn.


I cannot find one single informed commentator who actually believes that Greece can recover from this crisis without defaulting. 

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

And the federasts of Brussels are just the same, except for them it's junket, not junkie. Their reason to support Greece is so that their gravy train of massive salaries, gold-plated pensions, limitless expense accounts, boondoggle schemes, etc etc etc is all about to come to an end.

The hard-pressed tax-payer should keep his/her fingers crossed that this nonsense comes to an end.

Coney Island

Anonymous said...

@Coney Island,

Agreed 100%.

Sue said...

I believe this is a serious attempt at buying time, not for Greece but for those who stand to lose the most money. Back room deals will going on while Greece sinks deeper into the mire. Private & National assets will be sold at rock bottom prices and the country will be plundered, until there is nothing left to take.

Budgie said...

Coney Island - agreed. This charade is for the 'benefit' mainly of the German taxpayer, and also other countries taxpayers who contribute to the IMF. The EU elites will use other people's money to the last penny to defend their racket.

Greece is bankrupt, but whilst the EU can still prop up the Euro, the show will go on. Armageddon is postponed for now.

DP111 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
DP111 said...

A lesson from history.

Around 600 BC, Solon, philosopher, statesman and lawmaker, was confronted by huge levels of debt within Greece. The debt was so huge that it could never be re-payed. The level of indebtedness was big enough to lead to high levels of crime and social unrest. No one was safe. Even the rich could not build walls high enough to protect them from angry peasants and roving bands of highway men, wishing to wreak havoc on the money lending class. His solution was to cancel the debt, all of it, private and public, and start with a fresh slate. That is, the money lenders etal, took a haircut. The result was the rejuvenation of the economy.