Wednesday, 6 July 2011

Rebekah Wade facing trial?

Rebekah Wade as was, Brooks as is, who hit the headlines when she allegedly beat the crap out of her hard-man ex husband Ross Kemp (earning her Private Eye's nick of 'The Slapper'), ex-chum of Cherry Blair, is deep in the doo-doo. Of course the 'Screws' paid cash to corrupt coppers for story leads and inside details; everyone knows the score. Rebekah's sin was to lie to a Parliamentary committee about it. As lowly as one rates individual MPs, as sleazy and corrupt a collective body as they are, we must preserve the rights of Parliament to be told the absolute truth. 


As NOTW hacks and ex-hacks indulge in an orgy of back-stabbing and getting their retaliation in first as they dob each other for the Milly Dowler obscenity, we risk losing sight of the important story - Wade and some bent senior coppers lied to a Parliamentary committee. They must all be tried for this and serve time in jail if convicted. And Cameron is tarred by association - and this too will stick. 

12 comments:

Blue Eyes said...

Nobody in the "MSM" seems to be asking the obvious question of: even if you didn't "know" what was going on, as the person in charge are you not still the person ultimately responsible?

Weekend Yachtsman said...

@BE: the last person in public life to abide by that principle was Peter Carrington at the time of the Falklands crisis.

Of course, in the wealth-creating sector it's still true that, as we used to say, "you're only as good as your last shift".

Sean said...

The bit i am looking forward too, is when firms of lawyers start suing other firms of lawyers.

Edward Spalton said...

In the great scheme of things this is, though very nasty, relatively trivial. The BBC is pushing it to a ridiculously disproportionate extent (a happy conjunction of its anti Murdoch, ant-Tory agendas) and it's all within the media bubble so they can make news articles with reporters talking to each other.

It is the subjects upon which Parliament has failed to insist on emergency debates which trouble me. Still, they did do something for those poor circus animals. That shows the order of priorities.

Barnacle Bill said...

As a ship's master I enjoy something know as "ultimate responsibility" in both a legal and moral sense.
So whilst I am in my bunk trying to get a few hours sleep, I'm responsible for the Polish second mate's actions up on the bridge when he runs the ship aground through being more interested in texting his girlfriend than actually navigating safely.
Meanwhile if the cooks decides to give everyone on board food poisoning because he can't be bothered to store his food properly in the galley, I'm the first one the MCA wants to grill.
So like the captain at the helm of the NOTW, Ms Wade/Mrs. Brooks should be in the dock over this one.
No ifs, no buts ...

Budgie said...

I turned off BBC R4 because they went overboard on this. As Edward Spalton says it is because of the BBC's "anti Murdoch, ant-Tory agendas".

george said...

Did she not admit to the inquiry that she paid policemen for information ? The bit of the inquiry that I saw she agreed they paid the police. As she was about to expand her answer she was interrupted by Coulson who could see the danger she was getting into.
I see Coulson is now being thrown to the sharks by NI as a last ditch effort to save the BSkyB takeover of Sky News.

Scrobs... said...

"I turned off BBC R4 because they went overboard on this"

As most people in building know, you have to learn to read upside down - Raedwald will understand this.

Therefore, every time I hear Beeb hacks trying it on, I automatically turn their bits round and believe the opposite.

I wish they'd do the same to me with their heinous licence tax though...

English Pensioner said...

I'm still trying to find out how anyone knows that their phone (actually their voice-mail) has been hacked.
As far as I can ascertain, the only way is if someone leaves you a message, and a third party becomes aware of this. But for this to be true, the party leaving the message has to be absolutely sure that the same information hasn't been given to someone else who might have "spilt the beans".
Or am I out of touch with the latest technology?
What about e-mails; surely these use similar technology, holding a message on a server at an ISP, which can be accessed if you know the password. I would have thought that if you know a person's e-mail address, similar techniques could be employed to find the password.
Will this be the next scandal?

Dave_G said...

.... meanwhile, back in the 'real' world, the various economies go to r@tsh1t and not a peep on the news....

Anonymous said...

Why blame th MSM when the uk public have a lascivious yearning for the private information of the famous/ well known.
Look in the mirror.

James Higham said...

And Cameron is tarred by association - and this too will stick.

Absolutely and the sooner the prosecutions begin, the better.