Thursday, 21 March 2013

'Dismal economics'

'Dismal economics' is the general verdict on Boy George's election-focused budget; the Speccie gives us some graphics to illustrate quite how bad things really are. Meanwhile in the Eurozone things are hardly better; they're knotting and splicing like frenzied creatures to keep the masts upright as shrouds part all over. At a local level, there's a severe outbreak of 'I really can't be arsed' as firms, contractors, suppliers just seem to be going through the motions of doing business - somewhere the stress, the urgency, the pressures seem to have been lifted and things are coasting. Don't ask me why this seems so universal, but it does. Reps who once would have stalked with the tenacity of piranha fish make follow-up calls as though it's just a way of passing time; estimating departments have become positively Mediterranean in their speed of response.

Has the entire country gone on strike and I missed it?

7 comments:

right_writes said...

For more than sixty years, it's been like that in the NHS. As the long arm of the government dips into the wealth making capacity of this place, the ordure piles up and business takes on this glacial effect that you remark on.

You have to remember the most important thing to all of us, is to ensure that "the project" continues to develop. A successful Eurozone requires all currencies around it to be successively devalued until all (us) Europeans are in it together...

...Dave's on board... come on in Raedwald, the water is lovely.

mikebravo said...

The tellytubbygraph's take on boy george's budget is a kick start for another housing price boom. Brilliant! He is planning to set up his own sub-prime mortgage market. Why didn't someone think of that before?

Anonymous said...

Has the country gone on strike?

It may well have. A few years ago now, when Zanu was in power, I advocated that Britain just down tools, stop working and stop spending, in order to slam the brakes on Brown's public sector spending splurge. There comes a point where striving to earn and making that sale (and I am a career salesman) becomes just too hard. Too much effort is required and when you are successful, too much of your effort is taken by the government and squandered; so there's little point. The correlation between effort and reward seems broken; it certainly is in the public sector where little effort, if any at all, is required to earn big bucks in administration. In the private sector, we are just treading water, and this last budget has done nothing to rekindle my lost enthusiasm. Now when is my next holiday?...

Coney Island

Blue Eyes said...

R your description rings very true. I have tried to get work done on my flat but all the contractors etc. pretend to be keen rather than actually are keen.

I have asked a well-known carpet company to quote, twice, for a good easy profitable job. They don't come back to me.

I think a lot of people are now just waiting for armageddon.

Demetrius said...

Yes.

Edward Spalton said...

My bishop has an office portacabin with a leaky roof. He tells me that he cannot find any jobbing builder or handyman to do the job.

G. Tingey said...

R-W & anon

Not necessarily, or sometimes wrong, at least.

"Private" ownership can also set up hugely self-destructive perverse incentives, which deliberately (or not) discourage employees from doing a decent job, or even bothering at all.
Classic high-profile example is Jessops.
I could quote you another one I saw late last night, as well!