Wednesday, 10 July 2013

I'd love to see Plumbers in Parliament

Supporters of the Trade Unions have only got it partially right in their condemnation of Miliband's metropolitan elite party; they're not opposed to having working-class union members in Parliament; like their chums in the Conservative and LibDem parties, they're opposed to having anyone in Parliament who is not a dedicated member of Oborne's Political Class. Chair of the sixth-form debating society, Vice-President of the SU at Uni, internship at the UN then a 'job' as a researcher for an MP is the perfect resume for today's ambitious politician - just so long as it doesn't show a real job anywhere. 

And the system delivers to Mr Ed wholly inexperienced blow-ins like Luciana Berger (above) who can be parachuted into any convenient constituency in the country. 

Frankly, I'd love to see more plumbers in Parliament. And bus drivers, surveyors, army officers, farmers, WI Chairladies, small businessmen, nurses and merchant seamen. In fact anyone who has ever lived a real working life, whether a member of a Trade Union or of the Chamber of Commerce. I'd love to hear a Parliamentary debate thick with regional voices and local expressions, rather than dull Oxford English politicospeak. I'd love to see independent MPs balancing the gains to Anglia against the risks to Wessex when considering legislation.  

What I'll never agree to is an unjust impost that robs ordinary people to keep those like Berger in Schmuck and Schmutter.

8 comments:

right_writes said...

If you really want that, you will have to vote for your UKIP candidate....

But hurry, hurry hurry...

Once UKIP have had a taste of power (if that ever happens), that party too will almost certainly become infested with "professional politicians" of the type that you describe Raedwald.

It is not the parties as such that cause this, it is the type of people that are attracted to the lifestyle of pontification and general disregard for the freedom of one's fellow man.

talwin said...

I rarely disagree with you, Raedwald, but would you really like to see more merchant seamen in Parliament!!??

Think John Prescott!

Raedwald said...

Ah, wasn't it Nick Soames who used to call out "Giovanni - un gin tonic per favore" whenever Prescott ventured into the Commons bars? But seriously, even a Prescott is better value than the bland lobby fodder that now fills the place

Jackart said...

There are lots of Doctors, Army officers, lawyers and so forth in parliament. There are very few "researchers then MPs". It's just they disproportionately tend towards the front benches...

Anonymous said...

The executive should be scorched and scoured clean of the likes of Miliband minor, Dave and leg-over cleggie and all of their mates.

Then, an the executive should be made up of engineers, ex private [proven]businessmen craftsmen technicians, scientists[?], senior departmental civil servants and any suitable additions - the number of advisors should not be finite, though providing they have an independent income and not reliant on the taxpayer ticket.

With, also, the legislature totally separated from the technocratic-like professional executive.
Major decisions like; going to war, the EU energy, the Annual budget etc to be put to public plebiscite in the form of a national referendum.


Get rid of political parties.

G. Tingey said...

Again, please read ...
A Bad Dream pretty please?

right_writes said...

Read it Greg...

It's not exactly a revelation, even though it is refreshingly devoid of party posture... If that is the phrase I am groping for.

Edward Spalton said...

I would recommend "A Crisis of Trust" by Stuart Wheeler, (Bruges Group £7.50) which was sparked by the expenses scandal but goes on to show how the political class has become ever more isolated in its bubble. Certainly the 2,600 or so paid researchers and assistants include a high number of youngsters who would like a political career.

Payment of MPs, introduced in 1911 was £400 per year (say £40,000 now), free rail travel, franking for mail and 2,000 sheets of paper a year. It did enable a peaceful revolution, as men from humbler stations in life (many very able) could become MPs but did not have any "fiddle factor" like the disastrous experiment with expenses , begun in a small way in 1971.

One prescient MP saw that as a turning point and prophesied the coming corruption - Enoch Powell.