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Tuesday, 12 April 2011

New EU energy labels: A guide

Minimising resource use is often counter-intuitive. For example, I moved into my present home fifteen years ago to find one of those slim wall-mounted WC cisterns that delivered a 3 litre trickle when the button was pressed. You had to flush it six times to get rid of a paper hanky. I replaced it immediately with an illegally modified high-level cistern that delivers 10 litres each flush, with a 2m head; powerful enough to drive an MP's fat wallet round the bend and into the downpipe. The water saving over 15 years is enough to supply a small African village. 


The new Compulsory EU energy labelling regime is just taking hold. It's pointless. The factors people use when deciding a purchase of white goods are (1) dimensions - will it fit the space (2) finish - will it complement the decor and (3) capacity / speed / power / ease of use - will it make my life easier. The 'green' rating is nowhere. Which means our feudal lords are spending millions of our money in utterly pointless regulation; scrapping the energy labels would actually save more resources than printing them. 


So for anyone still confused over energy labelling, here's what it means:

3 comments:

Weekend Yachtsman said...

All true.

And, as I often say, to run out of water in the West of Scotland takes a really special organisational skill - such as that invariably displayed by the State.

The bloody stuff falls out of the sky almost every single day, ferchrissake.

Woodsy42 said...

That's why there is a water charge to remove the water too, so they get you both coming and going.

Wendt said...

All true. And, as I often say, to run out of water in the West of Scotland takes a really special organisational skill - such as that invariably displayed by the State. The bloody stuff falls out of the sky almost every single day, ferchrissake.