Monday, 6 February 2017

Corrupt EU Nomenklatura miffed at Romanian justice win

Political corruption is endemic throughout Europe, and Britain can only boast that our populist checks and balances make it harder here for bent politicians to cheat, steal and defraud than elsewhere. Despite a Parliament-wide expenses fraud scandal in the UK, jut a handful of the most egregious thieves were jailed. The political establishment rapidly realised that the Commons green benches would be empty if all the crooked MPs were acted against. The rest remain on probation, watched by the hawks of a free press that they yearn to muzzle. 


Elsewhere, auditors simply refuse to consider the EU's risible offerings of accounts. So mired by fraud and corruption, so deeply infiltrated by organised criminal networks, so abused by bent and hungry power-seekers are the Federation's finances that no one in Europe regards seriously their fatuous offers of financial records. The EU is corrupt to its core. 

I must admit that my previous confident prediction that François Fillon would walk the French Presidential election looks somewhat shaky now. It emerges that he fraudulently bunged his family members hundreds of thousands of crooked stolen Euros on the pretence that they worked for him - much on the same basis that our MPs claim their young nieces are qualified parliamentary assistants worthy of a £30k salary. It's just theft. Just not the sort of theft that earned a young rioter who stole three bottles of water six months banged up in a Victorian cell with a Muslim rapist and a bucket to shit in. 

So when Romania passed a decree legalising theft, fraud and crookedness by politicians and public officials provided the sums stolen came to less than £38k, bent little ears pricked up all over Europe. This may be small beer in the UK, where £38k is just a year's worth of flipping homes by our MPs, but in Romania it will build you a tasteless vulgar palace with gold taps and individual stables for the goats. I'll bet the EU nomenklatura were particularly interested; if they exempted all transactions of less than €0.5m from accounting transparency, they might just be able to find a bent auditor somewhere in Europe to sign off their accounts. All seemed well and establishment politicians and public officials were rubbing their hands.

Then the people of Romania took to the streets. The politicians remembered what happened the last time they did so, and rapidly backed down. The thieves decree was rescinded. All over Europe one could almost hear the gentle hiss as miffed politicians abandoned dreams of new scams and frauds and let the air out of the hubristic pomposity that criminal immunity confers. Little tear-soaked tissues were flushed from the cloaca of the Berlaymont. Empty Sancerre bottles crashed inverted into Westminster ice buckets. We, the people, have won this round - but the price of a Parliament free from corruption is eternal vigilance.

15 comments:

mikebravo said...

"...distributing free pretzels and tea in Victory Square."

Considered an ignorant display of populism by the technocrats in Brussels no doubt.

Dadad said...

The little people have spoken again. But what will it take to stop the corruption ?

Anonymous said...

The MOD used to publish an internal edict annually that there was no lower imit to fraud, £1.50 claimed for a bus fare for a journey never undertaken wasn't acceptable and would lead to dismissal.

The argument was that false claims, of whatever size, were a breach of trust and if one couldn't be trusted then that was it, out!

Oh that their political masters were as virtuous.

decnine said...

"...the price of a Parliament free from corruption is eternal vigilance."

AND a Free Press that occasionally offends people.

Anonymous said...

" But what will it take to stop the corruption ?"

A major change in human nature.

Don Cox

Dave_G said...


Given how enamoured Government is for setting budgets perhaps they should set one for their own services (subject to public approval of course) and let them argue amongst themselves how much each deserves.

Any overspending to be paid for out of their own pockets.

Ahhh - to dream.....

Mrs Proudie of Barchester said...

Perhaps the Balls-Cooper Collective needed the extra money to house and feed the Syrian refugees Yvette was so keen to take in...oh, wait a minute...

Seth said...

When signing over some accounts in my time in the Army for a Company Canteen after a deployment in Cyprus, I discovered that I was 1p short on a total spend of many thousands of pounds.

I reached into my pocket and handed over a coin. The pay Sergeant produced a receipt without comment. I was personally liable for the amount large or small, and a complete reconciliation to the penny was required and expected.

anon 2 said...

euroland always had a pox on it. The tragedy is: their rats and fleas in Britain have set that Plague on its biggest ever rampage. And there's no sign of fire in Londonistan!!

selsey.steve said...

" But what will it take to stop the corruption ?"
Nothing more than a dozen or so .45 rounds delivered appropriately.

Anonymous said...

Caesar never left.
Just moved house.

DeeDee99 said...

What will it take to stop the corruption?

It will never be stopped. But a few executions might focus their greedy little minds a bit.

Gardener Fisher said...

Funny that civilised people are swooning at what Trump is doing in the USA and yet ignored this issue, which crept onto the BBC radio news but I do not recall much other coverage or condemnations. Given that this is an EU member state it tells you all you need to know about the mess we are leaving behind. Perhaps it would speed things up if we agreed to leave London in Europe, as long as they paid their U.K. Taxes, of course.

Why not have your cake and eat it, especially if the Houses of Parliament were included?

James Higham said...

Bit by bit, like the Patriots edging towards that final end zone, we are closing in on victory.

selsey.steve said...

The direct threat of a cranially-aimed .45 ACP round tends to concentrate the mind wonerfully well, especially when it comes to coughing up just how much of the tax-payer's money one might have spontaneously privatised.
Perhaps such a method ought to be put to the test?