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Saturday, 26 January 2019

EUROPA RESURGAM!

The continent faces its biggest challenge since the 1930s. We urge European patriots to resist the globalist onslaught

The idea of Europe is born again.

'We've had enough of cultural heritage, enough of the value of place and national self-worth!' The wreckers cry. 'Let us destroy the burden of the past and the traditions of Europe's diverse peoples and create instead the secure blandness of an homogeneous empire, a celebration of mediocrity, a joyless characterless technocracy!'

Europe is being destroyed by bureaucratic socially-progressive corporatists, an elite of patrician managerialists, who would destroy every vestige of democratic self-government, and who would destroy the principles of Westphalian Sovereignty for which Europe's nation-states have striven since the seventeenth century.

This is the noxious climate in which Europe's elections will take place in May. Europe's globalists want to dismantle the historic Europe of Westphalian states and to replace them with an unelected, unaccountable and anti-democratic cabal of permanent and self-replicating officials, law-makers sans Justice, rule-makers sans Right, who wish to degrade our rich diversity into a grey, amorphous, dead culture of compliance and pettifogging risk-aversity.

Those who believe in the legacy of Burke, Hobbs, de Toqueville or Nijaz Ibrulj also believe in our ability to raise ourselves above the corrupt and power-hungry machinations of Brussels, will have faith in our ability to defend our peoples and cultures against this new and barbarous totalitarianism, three-fourths of a century after shedding the last fascist burden, and a generation after we razed the Berlin Wall to a stump.

The nations of Europe have given us Shakespeare, Schiller, Goethe, Voltaire, Verlaine, Mann and Dante. The technocrats have given us the Animal Waste Directive. They have banished love and joy on the Precautionary Principle - such emotions detract from technocratic rationalism. Love of the little platoons, for the local, for institutions within our compass are scoured from our earth in their unforgiving and relentless managerial trampling on the nations and peoples of Europe.

The greed of these unprincipled dullards for power and status will take our souls. So eagerly do they strive for the complete eradication of cultural identity that they will level the graves of our forbears, desecrate sacred memories and totems with the foulness of their touch. We must fight their depredations; we must speak our poems, recite our fables to our children, fire our micro-distilleries, thrill in our dance and our music, take pride in our raiment and costume, preserve the skills of the hearth and the oven and teach them to our sons and daughters in defiance of  the poisonous homogeneity of their multinational globalist factory-fertig foodstuffs.

From Tallin to Vienna, Porto to Budapest, we must fight these globalist managerialists, fight to preserve our nations, our cultural identity, our rich diversity, our local institutions and our allegiances. We are our soil, we are the heart of our lands, we are a Europe of nations and we must strive against the aggression and hate of these soulless monsters for our very existence. 

[written in response to a bunch of obscure 'intellectuals' of little wit and less wisdom who have signed a chain letter in favour of the global corporatists destroying our continent - see The Guardian]


==================
UPDATE

How could I forget - Happy Australia Day to all the 'Strines in the UK; sink one for me

51 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hilarious. Every town centre street has parades of KFC, McD's Starbucks, Dunkin' Donuts, Frankie and Benny's, and multiplexex showing the same Hollywood crap, all over Europe.

And you blame the EU for homogeneity.

Priceless!

Sackerson said...

@Anon: that is globalism, and EU is a scale model of it. When will you cease to be Anonymous, so at least we can be assured that your name is not Legion?

Anonymous said...

Don't worry. When the UK leaves the EU, you'll be able to buy Melton Mowbray pork pies made in Malden Massachusetts or in Memphis, and Cornish Pasties made in Corby or in Corbridge.

The EU is foremost in protecting local traditions in cuisine and in culture too.

The UK's appalling street scenes are down to its entirely sovereign planning law, which permits cheap, shoddy, Barratt-box developments etc. made of imitation brick and roof tiles, which are no more than coloured cement. It's some of the laxest in the EU.

And when we pull out of EU H&S, then as the recent horrific dam collapse in Brazil shows, maybe we can go back to the days of Aberfan and Flixborough too.

DiscoveredJoys said...

The letter is a classic, of its sort.

'...there is a new battle for civilisation.' Really? no mention of freedom of movement or immigration diluting the local culture, the local civilisation. No mention of the stultifying grey rules. No mention of the breakdown in democracy.

No, the letter is members of the patrician class getting wound up about their particular views of culture being found wanting, being challenged by rather a lot of ordinary people. Project Fear continental style. Projekt Angst perhaps?

Nigel Sedgwick said...

Anonymous at 26 January 2019 at 08:49: "And when we pull out of EU H&S, then as the recent horrific dam collapse in Brazil shows, ..."

Oh really?! What about the 2001 bridge collapse at Castelo de Paiva in Portugal.

"On 4 March 2001 at 9 pm, a 116-year-old metal bridge linking the town of Sobrado (a.k.a. Castelo de Paiva) and Entre-os-Rios (a bridge connecting Castelo de Paiva to Penafiel) collapsed, killing 59 people, including those in a bus and three cars that were attempting to get to the other side of the Douro river. The Hintze Ribeiro Bridge disaster prompted accusations of government negligence, and the public works minister Jorge Coelho resigned shortly after the disaster. There is a monument near the bridge in honour of the people who died."

So we don't need examples from outside of the EU to show civil engineering incompetence.

Best regards

Raedwald said...

Or even the Genoa bridge collapse last August .. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/aug/14/genoa-motorway-bridge-collapses-italy

Anonymous said...

Yes, that just shows what national, rather than EU supervision sometimes does, Raed.

That bridge was built before the EU existed.

Malcolm Stevas said...

DJ's reference to "immigration diluting the local culture" is significant, and it's surprising, RW, that you failed to acknowledge the huge cultural impact on our continent of mass immigration from outside Europe.
"The nations of Europe have given us Shakespeare, Schiller, Goethe, Voltaire, Verlaine, Mann and Dante. The technocrats have given us the Animal Waste Directive" is spot on: but those technocrats, allied to the global-corporate world for whom such things as international frontiers and national sovereignty are irritating anachronisms, have also given us mass immigration - the extent to which this is merely through apathy & incompetence, or deliberate, can be argued over, though it has always seemed clear that internationalism, Leftism, and the corporates' desire for cheap labour have facilitated the introduction. Germany and the UK have (for example) more than 6 million Muslims each, with France in the lead, pushing close to 9 million - these figures do not include the large numbers of others from Africa and the Subcontinent especially.
It is impossible to ignore the impact of this upon Europe's indigenous cultures: our urban geography has changed radically, to the extent that London (according to the 2011 Census) has well under half its people claiming to be "White British", with other towns & cities having a quarter or more of their populations Muslim.
The forces to which you refer, RW, have manifestly engaged in a relentless programme to make us accept this as natural, inevitable, and a good thing. I do not know how this will turn out.

Anonymous said...

Also you're pointing out failures at a national level in Building Regulations rather than those in EU H&S at work.

The classic example, of the horrors, which ensue from a nation outsourcing the inspections under its national regs - as our doctrinaire Tories have done - is the utterly inexcusable outrage of the Grenfell Tower fire.

If there were an EU-wide regime for inspection and enforcement, with sufficient dedicated, salaried, qualified staff, then I doubt that it would have happened.

Malcolm Stevas said...

"Anonymous" is remarkably starry-eyed about both the competence and the capacity of the EU to establish a continent-wide bureaucracy capable of eliminating (e.g.) the regulation of construction. One wonders how old he is, and how much attention he has paid to the EEC/EU - certainly far less attention than I have, since I've observed it from the start of our involvement.

Anonymous said...

Immigration from outside the EU is a sovereign matter for each of the member states.

there is no EU policy on this, nor authority to have one. It is not within the scope of the Treaties.

Personally, I find that the Germans, Poles, Dutch, Italians etc. enjoy a bevvy and a laugh just as much as the English do, which sums up most of contemporary culture.

Those who do not, or their forebears, come largely from the glorious British Commonwealth.

Don't they?

Raedwald said...

... as was the Pantheon, of course - some 1,980 years before the EU and still standing. And London's shoddy, jerry-built Georgian terraces, thrown up by rogues and cheats, are amongst our most sought-after homes with prices in the millions. Those that didn't collapse by about 1840 were generally safe.

Of course, neither the Pantheon nor London's Georgian terraces would be permitted under EU regulations - nor the Palace of Westminster itself, nor 98% of the buildings now standing in Europe.

You see, the Eurocodes on Seismic Resistance apply to every new structure in the EU - whether it's built in a high risk earthquake zone or not. This of course means wasted cost, high frictional costs of construction and more expensive accommodation for Europe's poor taxpayers.

Dave_G said...


The EU doesn't protect anyone other than the Corporates against product abuse or bending of rules. Witness the Amazon/Supermarket destruction of local shops, VW abuse of emmission regulations etc. Exposure didn't come about by careful management by EU officials, they were exposed by outside parties (the USA) keen to stop EU rules over riding American production techniques.

EU rules allowing Corporates to pay taxes in the countries most favourable to EU collection methods?

Globalist instructions to undermine manufacturing by excessive and unwarranted rules on energy production (costs)?

As for product protection... if the customer wants a genuine Cornish Pastie they should know where to get one. I can make an IDENTICAL pastie in my own kitchen so why shouldn't I be able to sell it as one? Product protection might satisfy those that seek EU 'protectionism' (which is exactly what the EU closed borders is all about) for their own self interest but it does nothing for the consumer. My pasties would be half the price of an 'original'.

The EU is a closed shop - controlled by Globalists and Corporatists who collectively seek to red-tape, regulate and taxate all SMBs out of existence.

The people of Europe are made to pay, heavily, for the political betrayal by EU officialdom in giving the people a good deal in life.

If the EU worked to make business easier and cheaper for EVERYONE maybe we wouldn't be seeking to break away from it.

Anonymous said...

Two people were killed when houses collapsed in Macclesfield after the force 5 earthquake in 1983, although their deaths were recorded as due to structural inadequacy in the houses, rather than by earthquake.

EU regs on that point are only forward looking, but would you rather that death traps were permitted?

Yes, it would appear.

Raedwald said...

I'm confident that British entrepreneurship will see us making Parmesan, buffalo Mozarella, Brie and Pont l'eveque in the Midlands, Proscuitto and Prosecco in Kent, Champagne in Surrey, Chorizo and Chourico in Suffolk and Sekt in Dorset. We may even start exporting it to the rest of the world at a price somewhat cheaper than our EU competitors

Billy Marlene said...

Stuff that lot Radders.

I’ll stick with my Suffolk bacon and half a dozen extra large double yolker fresh eggs picked up from Church Farm on my dog walk.

Yummy!

Mark said...

"Oh really?! What about the 2001 bridge collapse at Castelo de Paiva in Portugal."

What about the EU collapse that's ongoing? Maybe that's why there are bridges on Euro notes. The Euro, of course, having nothing whatsoever to do with huge numbers (of currently) unsellable houses being built in Spain and Ireland.

Anon old fruit, you are going to find yourself outside of the wondrous EU one way or another so you'd better get used to the idea.

Nigel Sedgwick said...

Anonymous at 26 January 2019 at 10:38: "Two people were killed when houses collapsed in Macclesfield after the force 5 earthquake in 1983, ..."

Looking at a complete list of UK earthquakes, there are none reported for Macclesfield after 1777, and none at all in 1983. Does Anonymous have a web-link for his claim?

More generally, it is reported there: "Nonetheless, earthquakes have on occasion resulted in considerable damage, most notably in 1580 and 1884; Musson (2003) reports that there have been ten documented fatalities – six caused by falling masonry and four by building collapse."

Thus ten fatalities in the UK over a period exceeding 400 years.; the Italians have had over 4,000 earthquake fatalities since 1950. Thus, in terms of building regulations, one must surely view appropriate Japanese-, Californian- and even Italian-levels of protection as way beyond cost-effective for the UK.

Best regards

Dave_G said...


Anon - "EU regs on that point are only forward looking,"

...are we therefore to soon expect the EU to enforce building construction capable of deflecting asteroids? or, less structurally resilient but more probable, nuclear-war-capable?

It's attitudes of 'forward-looking prevention' that restrict and indebt the vast population - witness the taxation demands to meet 'potential' effects of Climate Change when NONE of the alarmist predictions of disaster having ever come true or are ever likely to (exceptions being natural changes and the ability of mankind to adapt to them of their own accord i.e. coastal erosion and simply 'moving house').

The cost of Globalist Climate threats alone - perpetuated by the EU and all other Governments so not 'just' an EU (in)competence - runs into $trillions.

True leadership qualities and concern for the population would have the issue thrown out on the lack of evidence let alone the corruption permitted to enforce it and taxes created to abuse it. If the EU took this stance unilaterally they might gain some credence but we all know they are as corrupt and 'in it' as we expect from Globalist shills.





JohnRM said...


These EU wide laws also extend to waste management, with land fill discouraged because it is not possible in some EU countries, e.g. Holland. We had a perfectly sound waste management regime in the UK that has now significantly broken down as a result of the EU. Today The Daily Mail is campaigning for us to clean up the litter. Hopefully, when we have left the EU we will revert to our old waste management problems and the fly tipping and litter will disappear.

Anonymous said...

Horse meat scandal, breast implant scandal, Somerset level flooding due to EU water directives. Anyone?

(Not anonymous)

mongoose said...

Ein reich, ein volk, ein building inspectorate!

Anonymous said...

Rudders

Brilliant essay.

DP111

John Brown said...

Malcolm Stevas :

"The forces to which you refer, RW, have manifestly engaged in a relentless programme to make us accept this as natural, inevitable, and a good thing. I do not know how this will turn out."

It's obvious how this will turn out.

The UK will look more and more like those countries from which the immigrants are coming.

Anonymous said...

Yes, that Yorkshireman at the slaughterhouse in Todmorden, selling horsemeat as beef was a bit shabby eh?

Maybe an EU-wide, properly-staffed inspectorate would have stopped that too? And the UK-centred BSE outrage under Thatcher?

I wonder when the UK will opt back into the EU-wide ban on halal slaughter too?

Anonymous said...

Sorry. The 5.4 earthquake, which affected Cheshire and Merseyside was in 1984, not 1983. Its epicentre was in N Wales.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1984_Llŷn_Peninsula_earthquake

As I say, there were fatalities, but they were attributed to structural deficiencies, not to the quake.

The EU says, in Eurocode 8, denoted in general by EN 1998:

“..."Design of structures for earthquake resistance”, applies to the design and construction of buildings and civil engineering works in seismic regions."

The UK is not defined as a seismic region within the meaning of this document, so the rules have no material bearing.

Raedwald said...

Anon. Wrong wrong wrong.

The British isles are classified as 'very low seismicity' or 'low seismicity' which means design tests are lower than more risky regions in terms of the frequency, but not the magnitude, of the risk the EU identifies must be met by designs for a two-tier threshhold of (a)no-collapse and (b) damage limitation.
EUR 23563 EN - 2008

Raedwald said...

Anon - amd you'll find the detailed standards for the UK published by the BSI at https://ia801602.us.archive.org/28/items/bs.na.en.1998.1.2004/bs.na.en.1998.1.2004.html

Anonymous said...

Oh, so we're safer still than I thought, Raed.

Good news eh?

Raedwald said...

Why are all you bloody people so mendacious? It's just lie, lie, lie, all the time. I cannot take on trust one single thing you say. That goes for you and your whoremaster EU.

It's not about safety. Our safety has not changed one iota since the EU shat out this particuar turd. What it's caused is cost, delay, complexity, over-regulation, making construction less efficient for no benefit whatsoever EXCEPT to make building an office block in the UK as slow and handicapped as building one in Palermo - it's a hobble, a handicap, to ensure we're not more efficient than Guisepe

And thank God we'll soon be free of the nonsense.

Anonymous said...

"Raedwald said...
I'm confident that British entrepreneurship will see us making Parmesan, buffalo Mozarella, Brie and Pont l'eveque in the Midlands, Proscuitto and Prosecco in Kent, Champagne in Surrey, Chorizo and Chourico in Suffolk and Sekt in Dorset. We may even start exporting it to the rest of the world at a price somewhat cheaper than our EU competitors"

==

You say that as if it were a good thing. Well, maybe the Americans will buy Wensleydale made in West Bromwich, or Stilton made in Stockton-on-Tees, or the rest of the erzatz crap that you prefigure. One thing is for sure though. The twenty-seven EU countries of 440 million on our very doorstep won't, and they're bang-on too.

Raedwald said...

Tell that to the Irish who make 80,000 tonnes a year of 'Cheddar', 70% of which they sell to the UK and which is marketed under names such as 'Southdown Farm Cheddar' or 'Castle City Cheddar'

In future we'll ensure it's labelled as 'Irish Hard White Cheese made using UK cultures'

Anonymous said...

I'm sure, that if half of the world had not already been making "cheddar" then the UK could have approached the EU for protected status.

Are there any more besides "cheddar"?

But you are now arguing for the very opposite of what you claim in your post, aren't you? That the EU is inhibiting commerce, by protecting regional economies based on local traditions?

Make up you mind, do.

Raedwald said...

Not in the least - merely saying that if the EU won't buy our Parmesan, we won't buy their Cheddar. But we can sell OUR parmesan to the US and other markets.

Actually, if they don't accept our deal terms, the Irish cheese industry is dead anyway - WTO tariffs on cheese are something like £1,700 a tonne. Fool Varadkar will pray for an un-policed border so the Irish can smuggle chunks of their unsold Cheddar mountain into the UK to evade duty ...

Anonymous said...

Tsk. What about Canadian and New Zealand "cheddar"?

And aren't the Septics capable of making their own fake Parmesan etc.?

Span Ows said...

Your neighbours have gone at last Raedwald :-)

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-01-25/rothschilds-sell-last-piece-of-austrian-empire-after-200-years

Mark said...

"You say that as if it were a good thing. Well, maybe the Americans will buy Wensleydale made in West Bromwich, or Stilton made in Stockton-on-Tees, or the rest of the erzatz crap that you prefigure. One thing is for sure though. The twenty-seven EU countries of 440 million on our very doorstep won't, and they're bang-on too".

Maybe the Americans will in which case that would be good business.

Why do you assume that Wenslydale made in Stockton on Tees would be "erzatz crap"? Why do you assume that nobody in the EU would want to buy it?

If "half the world" makes Cheddar is that necessarily detrimental to "real" Cheddar and its makers? If I was, for example, selling UK tourism an iconic British brand like Cheddar being known worldwide would not really be a disadvantage?

To you anon, with your small minded, parochial bureaucratic mindset and "EU uber Alles" mentality, probably yes. But its not your attitude on this blog, its the actual EUs

Anonymous said...

Outlets in the EU are not allowed to sell Parmesan which is not the real thing, whether people want it or not.

Nor are they allowed to sell Melton Mowbray pork pies made anywhere other than in Melton Mowbray, nor Cornish pasties made anywhere other than in Cornwall.

Our friends in the East Midlands and in the West Country must be appalled, at the willingness with which soi-disant patriots would consign their uniqueness to global, exploitative, commercial, rootless interests.

You actually don't give a flying one, do you?

Cascadian said...

On the subject Raedwald addressed, it is interesting that a bunch of hopeless unknown "intellectuals" admit that the EU got many things wrong, but insist that more of the same is the cure for all that ails them.

As I said in a previous post the establishment /intelligensia /patrician rent-seekers are shitting bricks at the thought that democracy might prevail and more deplorables get elected in the upcoming EU elections. Of course these deplorables are equated to nazis, because the intelligensia have no viable argument.

I can only hope that more representatives such as Salvini and Orban come to the fore and rescue Europe from self-destructive drivers such as May, Macron and Merkel.

Meanwhile in yUK the can-kicking is getting desperate.

Span Ows said...

Anon, 26th Jan, 19:57 "Outlets in the EU are not allowed to sell Parmesan which is not the real thing, whether people want it or not".

Real Parmesan doesn't need a label so not sure how they'd police that.

Anonymous said...

Anon,'n' on 'n' on.
Radders, please put your "older post" button either immediately after you post or in your header.
Wading through the ravings to get to that escape button...... well what can I say and still be polite.
Doonhamer.

Dave_G said...


Discussion of the merits of Brexit and the dictatorial EU will be redundant before too long. If political upheaval doesn't bring the EU down then the financial upheaval will.

The Euro itself is going to destroy more than just Italy whose financial liabilities could be resolved by leaving the currency and returning to the Lira, devaluing and creating a boost to their export economy.

But this would bring down Germany via the exposure of banks to the enormous debt that would have to be written off. This might have happened in 2012 except the EU/ECB managed to depose Berlusconi and put their placemen in instead. The new leaders in Italy are less likely to fall for such manipulation.

And with Macron promising economic 'gifts' to subdue protesters - such protest still being censored from British TV/media - and forcing their own economy in the wrong direction (with no repercussions as the likes of Italy are put under...) there needs to be either a POLITICAL change or an ECONOMIC change to get the Euro and the EU back on course. You can't have one without the other though....

There are many signs that Europe/EU are headed for calamity and recent economic forecasts/results for the powerhouse that is (was) Germany doesn't bode well for this coming year let alone any time ahead of that.

There are too many problems with the EU and their enforced currency - neither will survive in the long term - possibly the short term.

No one will be crying over the demise of either. Bring it on.

Raedwald said...

Doonhammer - insufficient information.
What device and operating system are you using? What settings do you have?

Mark said...

"You actually don't give a flying one, do you?"

"must be appalled, at the willingness with which soi-disant patriots would consign their uniqueness to global, exploitative, commercial, rootless interests"

Anon, you really must stop projecting onto those who disagree with you. This is good and succinct description of the globalist disease that you're beloved EU epitomises. And, of course, those who support it.

Dave_G above mentions the Euro again (not the first time its come up in these threads) and what it's doing to the countries in its grasp.

Aren't they so benign and so connected to the provinces and traditions! The EU is not the only means by which unique foodstuffs can be recognised in this way (correct me if wrong here people but it seems to be essentially agricultural products).

With what the Euro is doing to Italy, Parmesan and the like might be all they'll have left if they remain in it. The Euro straightjacket has been going through Italian industry and business like a dose of clap for the last 20 years.

It will be particularly interesting to see what happens should the CAP come apart as well.

Anonymous said...

Yeah.

When I see Italianate piazzas springing up in every town centre, along with a standardised bierkeller in by each church, like we see US-style retail parks all over the damned place now, then I'll accept that you might have a point, Raed.

As it is, you just demonstrate how plain barmy you are.

Mark said...

What?

Raedwald said...

I think it's my psychotic stalker again. When they've forgotten their meds they (he/she) email me as well.

Mark said...

Ah, OK.

This stalker does understand that they will be able to get said meds post Brexit?

Anonymous said...

Most people, here, or in the rest of the EU, Leave or Remain voters, just want a Quiet Life.

They want freedom from war, from crime, from disasters of every sort, and to get on with their lives as agreeably as they can.

You who gather in this tiny little echo-chamber, apparently without kin or concern for your neighbours, clearly want to see the peace and friendship of the last seventy years in Europe, and the more recent one in Ireland go up in flames.

You will, I surmise, be disappointed, as you probably have been for most of your lives.

Mark said...

Anon, I think you're up now.

The EU has kept peace for the last 70 years? Of all the pro EU garbage, you've spouted this is the most specious. That you're finally come to this "argument" shows just how profoundly little you understand, either about the EU or those who oppose it.

Just go away, you silly, silly little hate filled man.

Malcolm Stevas said...

Anon is close to falling off the edge: he shares the very curious, blinkered, wildly ill-informed view that it's the EU which has kept the peace since WW2 - and that those of us who think it vitally important for the UK to leave the EU are the sad bunch of tired, uneducated, xenophobic peasants of Guardian columnists' imagination.
Extraordinary.
Look here, Anonymous, if your comments were more interesting & imaginative - supported by credible argument and evidence - I'd say you were simply mistaken, and tell you why. But your comments are not valuable. They are tired clichés. I've watched the EEC/EU since we joined, and decided long ago that it was a bad thing; my wife doesn't wholly share my views, since she's from a different EU country - and we share a 2nd home in a third EU country, where we spend much time. I am well travelled, highly educated, and have had a successful career. Don't try to pretend I don't know what I'm talking about, or that you are anything other than delusional - and perhaps lonely.